Troop 501 Eagle Scouts

Andrew Jackson - 2011

Project: Recycle Bins at the World Bird Sanctuary

William "Billy" John Fisher, III - 2012

Project: Fire Truck Reading Center at Arnold Branch Library

Christopher "Blake" Hufford - 2013

Project: Flag Pole Installation and Beautification Project at New Hope United Methodist Church

Paul Morton Claeys - 2013

Project: Playground Renovation and Update; Construction and Installation of Benches at New Hope United Methodist Church's Preschool

Archived Posts/Notices

Advancements Updated

Boy! Our Scouts were very busy at Camp Geiger! From advancement requirements to merit badges, the Scouts really worked hard. All of their advancement requirements, and completed merit badges have been updated in Troop 501′s Advancement System, TroopTrack. Please take a few moments to log in, and review your Scout’s advancements. Have him compare them to his Scout Handbook (this is VERY important). If there are any discrepancies, please have him send an email to scoutmaster@troop501.net, right away. Make sure to remind your Scout to indicate what his name is (we can’t always tell by the email address), and what needs to be changed. Also, be sure that he reviews his Participation history, to make sure that we have that right, as well. Camping attendance and Service Hour records are VERY important, too. You will notice that we have added a new tab fro Mic-O-Say, also. If your Scout was not tapped out, this will be empty, just as the OA tab will be, if he has not been tapped out for OA.

Merit Badge Make-up Day

boyscoutbadgesMerit Badge Make-up Day is scheduled for Saturday, August 9, at Beaumont Scout Reservation. All “partials,” or incomplete merit badge cards, will be returned to Scouts at the next troop meeting. The Scout can then take these, and evidence of the requirements completed since camp to the Make-up Day, and get his merit badge cards signed off on (marked as completed). A scout may also take “partials” from previous years, and camps, as well. This is a great way to get those last few requirements signed-off on, and get those merit badges completed!

Welcome to the Tribe

cropped-micosay_bannerPlease welcome into the Tribe of Mic-O-Say our four new Braves, and two new Honorary Warriors:

Brave Fast Track – Ian Hufford

Brave First Elk – Alex Messmer

Brave Speaking Water – Dennis Vancil

Brave Spirit Dance – Steven Feldewerth

Honorary Warrior Big Fast Track – Craig Hufford

Honorary Warrior Big Spirit Dance – Steve Feldewerth

How, How!

Thursday was a fantastic day for the Tribe of Mic-O-Say and for Troop 501.

To give you an idea of what the Tapping Fire is like, I am sharing a post from Troop 451, in Lewisville Texas, which has been coming to Camp Geiger for several years, now. This year, they had 14 youth, and 7 adults tapped into the Tribe of Mic-O-Say:

For many at Camp Geiger, the high point of the week comes Thursday evening with the Tapping Fire. This ceremony is where candidates for membership in the Tribe are publicly announced. The Tribe is the honor camping society of Camp Geiger [and Camp Osceola/H Roe Bartle Scout Reservation]. Its origins go back to the 1920s, a time when many honor camping societies stressing Native American themes came into being. Most of these were later subsumed within the Order of the Arrow, Scouting’s national honor camping society but the tribe continued its independent existence, as did some half-dozen others around the country. All of these have the mission to work within the BSA to improve Scouts and Scouting.

After nearly 90 years of experience, the Tribe knows how to put on a show.

Thursday can seem to drag by as everyone waits for the ceremony to begin. Our day started with a breakfast of scrambled eggs and apple juice, after which all of our boys headed to their specified locations.

It seemed as though we had barely finished (not true, actually) when it was time for our lunch of sliced turkey breast and cheese sandwiches with potato chips and purple bug juice of indeterminate flavor. Camp food has a reputation for being somewhat foul but here at Camp Geiger, it is decent, hearty fare, the flavor of which is made all the finer by the substantial appetites worked up in the course of moving about this hilly terrain. Those who did the Mile Swim on Wednesday, must surely have worked up even greater appetites. Likewise for our COPE course participants.

Soon, it was time for a dinner of burgers and fries. As before, the salad bar was popular. After dinner, tribesmen headed off to wherever it is that tribesmen go on the night of tapping fire, to do whatever they do. The rest of our troop returned to camp until it was time to gather in the Handicraft Corral to prepare for the long hike to Tapping Valley. Now, the valley is right below the corral but, the night of the Tapping Ceremony, the path to it is roundabout and punctuated by several stops along the way where various details of the history of Camp Geiger and the Tribe of Mic-O-Say are presented to all the Scouts and Scouters attending the session.

In the center of Tapping Valley, tribesmen have built an enormous bonfire.  From a distance, it looks much like any other, ordinary, campfire but up close, one can see that it nears 18 feet in height! What one took for good-sized sticks are actually the size of telephone poles and larger. Many families and visitors attend Tapping Fire to cheer-on their sons and spouses; others come just to enjoy the spectacle. As I mentioned, the Tribe knows how to put on a show.

The Scouts and Scouters approach the valley just around 9:00 PM. While they are still in the distance but in sight of the valley, the fire is ignited. This time of year, dusk is falling then and the fireflies come out in great abundance, their surprisingly intense flashes of light making the vegetation look alive in the dimming light. They offer a nice counterpoint to the growing blaze at the center of the valley.

As it grow darker, the valley grows lighter because the fire is growing bigger. The braves and warriors start to dance around the fire, accompanied by chanting and drums. The sight of the dancers, decked out in full dance garb (including the large, fancy feather bustles each boy makes), is dramatic indeed. The dancers circle the growing inferno, silhouetted as they pass in front and illuminated as they pass behind, all accompanied by the thrumming thump of the giant tom-tom and chanting in native tongues.

The campers approach, flanked by two long lines of older members of the tribe bedecked in their Native American-style finery. While the simplest Honorary Warrior’s costume is nevertheless quite elaborate, many costumes are far more impressive. The Sachems are there in their Mandan headdresses and the Medicine Men in their plains war bonnets, as are the chiefs and chieftains. Many sport elaborate beadwork requiring hundreds of hours of painstaking detail and many include optional items to dress up their already-fancy garb. The effect is truly stunning.

The campers circle the fire, one deep, facing the flames. Among them are the young men who may be called to be candidates for membership. Once everyone is in place, two lines of torches appear on the precipitous slope of Cardiac Hill. At the head, between the torch bearers, is the Tapper. This prestigious role requires that a young man be able to run down that declivity brandishing a flaming torch, held high in his left hand, and a tomahawk, held high in his right. With a mighty war whoop, he charges down the steep slope and into Tapping Valley to enter the enormous circle of expectant Scouts and Scouters.

A crowd of nearly 500 campers makes a very large circle indeed and the tapper makes a complete circuit, both arms held high, before he begins to tap out candidates on his second pass. When a boy is tapped, the Tapper stops in front of him and taps him once on the left side of his chest. This is a ritual tap and the word tap describes the action accurately. The candidate is then tapped on his right shoulder and sent to stand before the presiding Chief in front of the roaring fire. The Tapper may circle past a candidate several times before he decides to stop and tap him. This only increases the palpable suspense that potential candidates feel as the watch the tapper making his rounds.

The Tapper continues making circuits until every candidate has been tapped. Then the Chief, Chieftains, and Medicine Men give the candidates, now styled “Foxmen” several charges before they are lead off by the runners (senior Scouts in the Tribe) to experience their Mic-O-Say ordeal. The speaking parts demand elocution and a truly stentorian voice; no electronic amplification or lighting is used in the ceremony. All the light is from flames and all the sound is that of the human voice or the giant drum. When the chants are sung, several voices in unison fill the valley but when a lone Chief or Medicine Man addresses the crowd, it is that voice and that voice alone that must be heard. It helps to be in a valley but, more crucially, it helps that the crowd is prepared to be silent and listen while the speakers are passing on their messages.

The braves and warriors then gather around the fire to perform a dance of joy, celebrating the fine new candidates who may become new braves. The whooping and ululations are thrilling as they dance about, bathed in the orange firelight. The world then looks black and gold. One gets a sense of what it might have been like to belong to a tribe long ago.

A spectacular moment comes as the fire burns down a bit and the upper parts collapse onto the lower ones. This sends a dense column of sparks skyward, burning bright against the darkening sky. The brightly-glowing sparks rise upward until they seem to merge with the stars scattered across the heavens, making it seems as though the Tapping Fire is the source of them all.

Then it is time to call out the candidates for Honorary Warrior. These are Scouters who have served their units and Scouting. They are not ritually tapped (that honor is reserved for Scouts) but instead, the Chief calls them forward by name. They too are given explanations and charges before being led off.

For the public, that is the end of the ceremony though for the Foxmen, their night is yet young.

Indeed, Thursday was a fantastic day for the Tribe of Mic-O-Say and for Troop 501.

390px-Tapping_Ceremony_Pony_Express_Council_07_15_2010

Troop Calendar Updates

Since returning from camp, we have been busy getting ready for the upcoming year. You will notice that the Troop Calendar has been updated with Council and District events (training, Camp-O-Rees), Order of the Arrow events, and a few Troop fundraising events, as we are aware of them. Please review the calendar, as we will be preparing the Troop’s Calendar for the coming year in just a couple of short weeks.

Troop Radios

0002837791012_500X500In light of all of the adventures that Troop 501 has, we have invested in some new Cobra CXT595 FRS/GMRS two-way radios. These radios are rugged and durable, water proof, and have a range of up to 32 miles (in the most ideal line-of-sight conditions). As the best ranges are obtained on the higher power GMRS channels, we will operate on Channel 15 (channel 05 is on the FRS frequency, and uses lower power, producing a weaker signal). To reduce interference from other users on other radios, we will use CTCSS code 01. By using CTCSS encoding, we maintain backwards compatibility with older handsets that do not have DCS encoding. The display should read 1501. Cobra handsets that feature 15 channels will need to be tuned to channel 11. Though Troop 501′s radios are compatible with other brands of FRS/GMRS radios, some field testing may be required to synchronize tuning. Another feature of these radios is that they will automatically receive severe weather warnings from the National Weather Service. The manual is available, here.