Troop 501 Eagle Scouts

Andrew Jackson - 2011

Project: Recycle Bins at the World Bird Sanctuary

William "Billy" John Fisher, III - 2012

Project: Fire Truck Reading Center at Arnold Branch Library

Christopher "Blake" Hufford - 2013

Project: Flag Pole Installation and Beautification Project at New Hope United Methodist Church

Paul Morton Claeys - 2013

Project: Playground Renovation and Update; Construction and Installation of Benches at New Hope United Methodist Church's Preschool

Archived Posts/Notices

Troop Radios

0002837791012_500X500In light of all of the adventures that Troop 501 has, we have invested in some new Cobra CXT595 FRS/GMRS two-way radios. These radios are rugged and durable, water proof, and have a range of up to 32 miles (in the most ideal line-of-sight conditions). As the best ranges are obtained on the higher power GMRS channels, we will operate on Channel 15 (channel 05 is on the FRS frequency, and uses lower power, producing a weaker signal). To reduce interference from other users on other radios, we will use CTCSS code 01. By using CTCSS encoding, we maintain backwards compatibility with older handsets that do not have DCS encoding. The display should read 1501. Cobra handsets that feature 15 channels will need to be tuned to channel 11. Though Troop 501′s radios are compatible with other brands of FRS/GMRS radios, some field testing may be required to synchronize tuning. Another feature of these radios is that they will automatically receive severe weather warnings from the National Weather Service. The manual is available, here.

D-Day

DDay

Today, June 6, 2014, marks the 70th anniversary of the Normandy Invasion, that we have come to know as D-Day. On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.

Today, we remain ever grateful for the sacrifices of the brave men and women that landed on the shores of Omaha Beach, and all of those who fought ever so bravely to keep the our own shores and country free… In World War II, The Great War to End All Wars, Vietnam, The Korean Conflict, Desert Shield and Storm, and in Iraqi and Enduring Freedom, and in all the wars and conflicts that our country has undertaken.

So, tonight, as you crawl into your snug little sleeping bags, just for a moment, remember that 70 years ago tonight, 200,000 young men were aboard ships and planes on their way to France for you. Yes… for you. So that you and I could grow up in a world of freedom. 9,000 of them gave their lives 70 years ago, for us. For today. For tomorrow.

140605123348-d-day-in-numbers-story-top

Here comes the One

Troop 501 Theme Song:

Here comes the One, here comes the big Five-Oh-One!
Troop Five-Oh-One, our troop is second to none.
Just say Five-Oh-One–,
You’ve said it all–.
Here comes the best of troops so lift your voice, let’s hear the call.

Troop Five-Oh-One’s the one that’s leading the rest,
Troop Five-Oh-One is the– ver-y best.
One sight ‘ll tell you,
So loud and clear.
There’s only one Troop Five-Oh-One!
(there’s only one Troop Five-Oh-One)

When you say Five-Oh-One, there’s nothing left to say (when you say 501).
When you say Five-Oh-One, the best is on its way (when you say 501).
The best is coming,
Let’s hear the call,
We’re Five-Oh-One, we’ve said it all (we’ve said it all)!

Here comes the One, here comes the big Five-Oh-One!
Troop Five-Oh-One, the best is second to none.
Just say Five-Oh-One–,
You’ve said it all–.
Here comes the best of troops, so lift your voice, let’s hear the call.

We’re Five-Oh-One the one that’s leading the rest,
Once you’ve seen us, you’ve seen the ver-y best.
One sight ‘ll tell you,
So loud and clear.
There’s only one Troop Five-Oh-One!
(there’s only one Troop Five-Oh-One)

We’re Five-Oh-One, the troop that makes Scouting so fun.
When you’ve seen Five-Oh-One, you’ve seen number one!
The best is coming,
Let’s hear the call,
We’re Five-Oh-One, we’ve said it all (we’ve said it all)!
Ya da da da da da da da da da da

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Thanks to Mr Birtley, who recently took a trip down Memory Lane, to his Scouting youth, and after reminiscing about his own days as a Scout, drafted words to a Troop song to be sung to the tune “Here Comes The King.”

Troop Meeting/Flag Retirement Practice

Our next troop meeting, scheduled for May 20, will be at VFW Post #2184, located at 6327 Lemay Ferry Road, just across the Meramec River bridge. During our next troop meeting, we will be practicing for the May 24 Flag Retirement Ceremony that we will be doing at VFW Post 2184. Meeting will start at 7:00 pm. We need everyone to be in attendance, please.

Saint Francois State Park Campout

DSC05765May 16-18, we will be camping at Saint Francois State Park. There will be loads of activities for us to do, to include fishing, hiking, and maybe, just maybe (depending on weather) a little bit of wading in the Saint Francois River. You will find a topographical hiking map, here. Be sure to bring your fishing gear, swim trunks, and towel (just in case). The cost of this campout is $19 for Scouts ($15 for food, $4 for park fees) and $4 for leaders. This is one of Troop 501′s favorite camping spots.

Due to the ferocious nature of ticks, already, this year, be sure to bring sunscreen and bugspray. REMEMBER: NO AEROSOL!!! There will be a bug-spray shake-down before we pull out on Friday night. Departure time will be 6:30 pm, on Friday night.